26 February 2011

Farmington Industry, Friday, March 4th

Farmington Historical Society Meeting
Farmington Industry
March 4th, 2011
7:00 PM
Goodwin Library Museum.

At the meeting, Roger Belanger, a Farmington resident and historian, will present a picture of downtown Farmington through the years. In words and pictures, Roger will describe what the Farmington downtown was like at the turn of the last century and describe the changes that happened as the town changed and evolved to its present day appearance. You'll learn about the buildings and businesses you know, and some that you didn't know where here.

Come join us for the presentation. A meeting of the Historical Society will follow.

21 February 2011

History Conference for Advanced Placement Students

March 14, 15, or 16, 2011 
Advanced Placement History Conference

The New Hampshire Historical Society’s annual Advanced Placement History Conference is a unique opportunity for A.P. History students to meet for a day of presentations and hands-on activities. The focus of the program is on approaching Document Based Questions effectively. William O. Kellogg, author of the Barron’s study guide for A.P. U.S. History, is the keynote speaker and will illuminate what exam readers are looking for in student writing. 

Sponsored by The NHHEAF Network Organizations and the John L. Frisbee Education Endowment.
Location: 30 Park Street, Concord, NH
Cost: $
13 per student; advanced registration required.
Contact: Education Services Coordinator Chris MacLeod at 603-856-0604 or cmacleod@nhhistory.org

 Sponsored by the New Hampshire Higher Education Assistance Foundation (NHHEAF.org)

10 February 2011

Coming up at the March Meeting: Farmington Industry

Friday, March 4th at 7:00 PM at the Goodwin Library


Ever walk downtown in Farmington and wonder what it was like 100 years ago?  Downtown Farmington wasn't always the way it is now.  Years ago, Main Street and Central Avenue were very different places.  Farmington, like most towns, evolved over time.  Buildings are built and occupied, but sometimes the occupants don't stay the same.  As society and it's tastes change, so do the town's center.  The downtown area once had movie theaters, soda fountains, grocery stores, furniture stores, and of course, shoe shops and factories. At the March 4th Meeting of the Farmington Historical Society, Roger Belanger, a Farmington resident and historian, will tell you just that. In words and pictures, Roger will describe what the Farmington downtown was like at the turn of the last century and describe the changes that happened as the town changed and evolved to its present day appearance. You'll learn about the buildings and businesses you know, and some that you didn't know where here.  You'll learn how some of our downtown buildings were destroyed , rebuilt, and destroyed again. It will be a fascinating trip down memory lane for some and an interesting perspective on what life in Farmington used to be like for others. Regardless of what you remember or how old you are, it is sure to be an interesting perspective of our downtown history.

 The Central House in 1913

The Thayer & Osborne Shoe Factory in 1915
The Opera House in 1914 contained the Library

Old stereoscope looking north on Main Street, circa 1865-1885
Photo credit: WikiMedia Commons

Come join us on March 4th and learn about our downtown's history.

The monthly meeting for members of the Historical Society will follow the presentation.
The public is welcome to attend.  Light refreshments are served.