26 August 2014

Article-The History, Science and Poetry of New England’s Stone Walls


The June issue of Earth magazine had a wonderful article on the history and science of new England's stone walls. The article was written by John-Manuel Andriote and it is a good read for those very familiar with our famous walls or those who don't know anything about them. Two parts of the article that are a real treat. The first is a series of dioramas from the Fisher Museum that chronicle landscape history and the second is a pictorial identifying key for stone walls, great for activities with children.




Hay Day 2014 Recap and Photos


The Farmington Historical Society would like to thank everyone who stopped by our Hay Day booth and visited the Museum on Saturday. It was a pleasure to talk with all of you. We were excited you liked the balloons and the new Farmington Historical Society t-shirts and baseball caps. We hope to see you when our free monthly presentations start back up in October or for our regular monthly Historical Society business meeting in September. Again, thank you for your support.

Jim Horgan, the president of the Farmington Historical Society, wants to issue a giant thank you to Joann Doke, Joyce White, Resta Detwiler, Judy Thompson, and Martha Horgan for tending the Hay Day booth and the Henry Wilson Museum for the Farmington Historical Society and to Rebecca Howard, Stan Freeda and Kyle Leach for all the prep work.








09 August 2014

Society Cleans Town Pound Historic Site


The Town Pound on Pound Road in Farmington.
Members of the Historical Society cleaned up around the Town Pound on Sunday, August 10, at 1:00 PM.  The clean up did not take too long, but the Society hoped that sprucing up the historical site will allow for easier recognition and appreciation of our landmark.  The Town Pound was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1993.  The Pound was sold to the Raab Family  in 1918 after it was no longer in use by the town. The family donated the structure back to the Town of Farmington in 1975.  The Town Pound site is maintained by the Farmington Historical Society.  The Society hopes to continue improvements to the site.

Collage of photos before clear up began.
Collage of photos after the clean up.
Historical Society Members display their hard work.
The pound as it survives today is a substantial structure, whose fieldstone walls are seven-feet high and three-feet wide at the base. Along the top, the walls terminate with long granite capstones. There is a five-and-a-half-foot wide opening on the southeast side (facing Pound Road). Some of the stones have been removed, the lintel has fallen and broken into three pieces, and the wooden gate is no longer extant, but the pound is otherwise similar in appearance to the photograph which appears in the 1904 publication, Souvenir of Farmington, New Hampshire. (The presence of saplings growing on the lot was evident even in 1904.)

Photo of Farmington Town Pound from the 1904 Souvenir Book
The pound occupies a small lot measuring 120 feet by 130 feet in the geographical center of the town. The balance of the parcel supports a young growth of mixed hardwood and conifers.

The pound was built in 1823 by the Town of Farmington to replace an earlier wooden structure that was built in 1802.  It is one of a few well-preserved pounds in southeastern New Hampshire. It remained in use until late in the 19th century.  It was sold to a private owner in 1918. Eventually, it was given back to the town, and is now maintained by our historical society.

Learn More

Farmington Town Pound on Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Farmington_Town_Pound

Strafford County Listing of Historic Places on National Register of Historic Places
http://www.nationalregisterofhistoricplaces.com/nh/Strafford/state.html

Town Pound Registration Form on National Register of Historic Places
http://pdfhost.focus.nps.gov/docs/NRHP/Text/93000884.pdf

Souvenir of Farmington New Hampshire 1904 Booklet on Scribd

Town Pound as it appears in satellite photos from Google Earth.  Look for the Farmington Town Pound pin on Google Earth.  http://www.google.com/earth/