03 November 2012

December 7: Antique Appraisal with David Aubert


"Antique Appraisal Evening"


Friday, December 7nd
7:00 pm
Goodwin Library
Historical Society Museum

presented by 
David Aubert
Auctioneer and Antique Dealer

David Aubert, of Aubert Auctions, a local family business since the 1930's, will begin a two hour program of antique appraisal.  Dave Aubert brings over 30 years of that experience to your door. In 1974, Dave became the youngest auctioneer to be licensed in the State of New Hampshire. In the Fall of 1979, Dave began advertising Aubert Auctions and Antiques with local media offering home visits to purchase outright gold, silver and various other objects of value. His reputation speaks for itself with over 30 years of experience evaluating antiques, jewelry and coins in the Northeast and St. Petersburg, Florida area.
David will give verbal appraisals only.  Due to our two hour limitation, attendees wanting to have their items appraised will be asked to sign a card at the start of the event.  Cards will be drawn randomly from those submitted.  Participants are limited to two items in the interest of time.  David will continue to appraised items by random drawing until 9:00 PM.  We'll try to do as many as we can while respecting the time limitations.  We regret that we might not be able to appraise everyone's items.

Note:  The Farmington Historical Society will convene for it's regular monthly meeting at 6:30 PM.  The business meeting will end at 7:00 PM at which time, the antique appraisal will begin.

Learn More

Aubert Antiques on the Web
http://www.aubertauctions.com/


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19 October 2012

Annual Pot Luck November 2

"Annual Meeting & Pot Luck Dinner"

Friday, November 2nd
7:00 pm
First Congregational Church Vestry

presented by 
Farmington Historical Society
Annual Meeting


The Historical Society meets once a year for our annual Pot Luck Dinner.  We meet in the Congregational Church Vestry, bring something to share, and all have dinner.  We also elect our officers at this meeting and organize ourselves for the coming year.
The most important thing, is that we have good food, good company, and good fun.
Join the Farmington Historical Society and join us for our Annual Dinner








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01 October 2012

October 5: One Room School Houses with Stephen Taylor

"New Hampshire's One-Room Schools: The Romance and the Reality"



Friday, October 5, 2012 
7:00 pm
Goodwin Library
Historical Society Museum

presented by 
Stephen Taylor
former NH Commissioner of Agriculture  

Hundreds of one-room schools dotted the landscape of New Hampshire a century ago and were the backbone of primary education for generations of children from the early 19th century onward. These schools are revered in literature and lore, but were beset with problems, some of which are little changed in today's education environment. The greatest of these issues was the method of financing the local school and the vast differences in ability of taxing districts to support education. Other concerns included teacher preparation and quality, curriculum, discipline, student achievement and community involvement in the educational process. Steve Taylor will explore the lasting legacies of the one-room school era and how they echo today.

Learn More

Stephen Taylor Real New Hampshire article on UNH Magazine Online   http://unhmagazine.unh.edu/sp11/steve_taylor.html



27 August 2012

Presentation Schedule for Coming Year almost Complete

"Program Schedule for 2012-2013"
Presentations are at 7:00 PM 
All presentations are given in the Historical Society Museum on the lower level of the Goodwin Library unless otherwise noted.

October 5th  
Stephen Taylor
former NH Commissioner of Agriculture
Note:  sponsored by the NH Humanities Council

"New Hampshire's One-Room Schools: The Romance and the Reality"

Hundreds of one-room schools dotted the landscape of New Hampshire a century ago and were the backbone of primary education for generations of children from the early 19th century onward. These schools are revered in literature and lore, but were beset with problems, some of which are little changed in today's education environment. The greatest of these issues was the method of financing the local school and the vast differences in ability of taxing districts to support education. Other concerns included teacher preparation and quality, curriculum, discipline, student achievement and community involvement in the educational process. Steve Taylor will explore the lasting legacies of the one-room school era and how they echo today.

Stephen Taylor Real New Hampshire article on UNH Magazine Online   http://unhmagazine.unh.edu/sp11/steve_taylor.html


November 2   
Annual Meeting & Pot Luck Dinner
The Historical Society meets once a year for our annual Pot Luck Dinner.  We meet in the Congregational Church Vestry, bring something to share, and all have dinner.  We also elect our officers at this meeting and organize ourselves for the coming year.
The most important thing, is that we have good food, good company, and good fun.
Join the Farmington Historical Society and join us for our Annual Dinner



December 7    To Be Announced


March 1  
Larraine Meyer

"Decorating with Antiques"


Perhaps, the story of how Lorraine became an antiques dealer is the most interesting part of this most interesting woman’s life. She attributes it all to being raised in a convent. She says convent school children were allowed very few personal items. Indeed, she explains with a laugh that this is why she loves being surrounded by “clutter”. In essence, attempting to make up for what she feels she missed as a child. At the age of nine, her parents divorced. Her father, as she explained “got” her and promptly placed Lorraine in a convent with nuns, who all became her “mothers”. Lorraine says her entire worldly possessions were contained in one tiny black suitcase. It is her belief that she reacted to deprivation by later accumulating anything that caught her eye.

from She's One of a Kind   http://www.thegavel.net/myers203.html


April 5th  
Jean Davenhall

"Sawyer Prints"


Description to be posted soon.









May 3rd  
Martha Cox
Professional Associate of the American Institute of Conservation

"The Conservation/Restoration of Oil Paintings"


Description to be posted soon.



Visit Martha on the web at http://home.metrocast.net/~mcox/GreatWorks/Welcome.html






June 7th   

David Decker

"The Life and Career of General George Thomas"


A presentation on the life and career of General George Thomas, with special emphasis on his unbroken string of victories throughout the civil war.  Thomas is well known as the best commander on defense in the war. He twice saved the union army from destruction at Stone’s River and at Chickamauga. After this second battle, the newspapers dubbed him "the Rock of Chickamauga," and President Lincoln called his effort the most heroic act in the history of the world.
Watch a brief video of highlights of David's presentations on You Tube at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MxScy9nLiX0 



Historical Society Meetings

All meetings are held on Friday evenings at 7:00 p.m. in the historical museum on the lower level of the Goodwin Library, with the exception of the Annual Meeting in November.  Meetings are free and open to the public.  Membership is $5/year.


2012 Officers
               President:            Dottie Bean
               Vice-Pres:          Norma Park
               Secretary:           Joyce White
               Treasurer:           Rebecca Howard
               Auditor:              Lola Wallace
               Public Relations:  Joann Doke & Stan Freeda
               Curators:            Rebecca Howard & Lola Wallace

In addition to caring for the museum and presenting programs of interest, the Society published the pictorial book Images of America - Farmington, available at the library for $16.99, and annually awards a $500 scholarship to a graduating Farmington High School senior.

Contact us at FarmingtonNHHistory@gmail.com                                          
                                             



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11 May 2012

June 8 2012: Special Presentation Celebrating Vice President Henry Wilson


" Vice President Henry Wilson - Celebrating the 200th Anniversary of His Birth"

Friday, June 8th 2012
7:00 pm
Goodwin Library
Farmington Woman's Club

presented by 
John Nolan
Editor, Rochester Times




John's presentation to the Historical Society was recorded and is available for viewing below.



Watch John Nolan's Presentation on You Tube.


Aside from being a Farmington Historical Society Member and the Editor of the Rochester Times, John Nolan is the President (and only member) of WOOOF, the organization dedicated to hurtling Wilson Out Of Obscurity Forthwith.  On this evening, John will present a program on Farmington's (once) famous son. Wilson, born Jeremiah Jones Colbath, in 1812, spend half of his early life in Farmington as an indentured servant, before hightailing it to Natick, Mass, to be a cobbler. He entered Massachusetts politics, became a U.S. Senator, had an affair with a southern spy before the Battle of Bull Run, and unwittingly blabbed secrets that almost led, ironically, to his own capture. After the Civil War, there followed an investment scandal, but Teflon Wilson became V.P. under President Ulysses S. Grant.  He died in office in 1875.

WOOOF President Nolan will present this musical, interactive, and historically accurate program in two acts.

Act 1 covers the life and times, trials and tribulations, triumphs and failures of Henry Wilson. The chorus numbers "Slavery in New Hampshire" and "The ballad of Henry and Wild Rose O'Neal" are featured in this act.

Act 2 recounts the struggle by WOOOF President Nolan and others to resurrect the name of Farmington's Favorite Son, Henry Wilson, and return it to its proper place of prominence, forthwith!  In doing so, he encounters Henry's reincarnation, spoofs NH Public Television, searches for a WOOOF V.P. of national stature, and more. Songs in this half include "The Henry Wilson Blues," "Poem, Poem on the Grange," "The Ghost of Henry Wilson" and the soaring finale, "Henry Wilson Has Two Names."

The meeting will be free to the public, but donations will be requested and accepted at this presentation to support the Historical Society Scholarship Fund.  The presentation will be held in the Farmington Woman's Club Room in the upper floor of the Goodwin Library.  Refreshments will be served.

Please bring your singing voice and save room for those refreshments.

Henry Wilson Presentation Poster 2012


Henry Wilson Presentation Program 8 June 2012


http://www.cowanauctions.com/auctions/past-item.aspx?ItemId=8025  


Learn More

John Nolan: Telling Tales One Crime at a Time on NHPR
http://info.nhpr.org/telling-tales-one-crime-time

Henry Wilson on Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Wilson

For WOOOF, the Outlook is Excellent on Farmington Corner, 2004
http://www.stephaniepiro.com/fc295.htm

Bentsen Takes Political Gamble on Farmington Corner, 1988
http://www.stephaniepiro.com/fc133.htm

18th Vice President Henry Wilson on NH Outlook, 2004
http://www.nhptv.org/outlook/sprogramdate.asp?prog_num_id=919

Henry Wilson on Biographical Directory of US Congress
http://bioguide.congress.gov/scripts/biodisplay.pl?index=w000585

Henry Wilson in the US Senate Art and History section
http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/generic/VP_Henry_Wilson.htm

The Death of Henry Wilson by Isaac Bassett in the US Senate Art and History section
http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/art/special/Bassett/tdetail.cfm?id=29

A Famous Citizen of Natick Massachusetts Still Remembered
http://activerain.com/blogsview/1730520/a-famous-citizen-of-natick-massachusetts-still-remembered




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22 April 2012

May 4th Meeting: New Hampshire's Grange Movement: It's Rise, Triumphs, and Decline



"New Hampshire's Grange Movement: It's Rise, Triumphs, and Decline"

Friday, May 4
7:00
Goodwin Library

presented by
Stephen Taylor
former NH Commissioner of Agriculture (25 years), scholar, farmer, journalist

Much of rural New Hampshire in the late 19th century was locked in a downward spiral of population decline, abandonment of farms, reversion of cleared land to forest and shrinking of villages, all of which contributed to widespread feelings of melancholy and loss among its residents.  The development of the Grange movement in the state in the 1880's and 1890's was aided greatly by people's hunger for a new vehicle to draw communities together for social interaction, entertainment and mutual support.  As the Grange rapidly established chapters throughout the state its influence in public affairs expanded greatly as well, such that by 1910 it had become a major force in policy-making in Concord, while many of its members had risen to important leadership positions, including that of governor.  The Grange brought an agenda that aligned closely with the Progressive wave that swept New Hampshire politics in the early 20th century and many of the initiatives it advocated became law, placing the state at the leading edge in a number of areas of reform.  This lecture will address the rise, the triumphs and the eventual decline of the Grange movement in New Hampshire.


This program is sponsored by the New Hampshire Humanities Council.


Learn More

New Hampshire State Grange
http://www.nhgrange.org/Home/

National Grange of the Order of Patrons of Husbandry on Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_National_Grange_of_the_Order_of_Patrons_of_Husbandry




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26 March 2012

April 6th Meeting: Guy Guinta Jr presents "Lilacs"

 “Lilacs” 

Friday, April 6th
7:00
Goodwin Library

presented by
Guy Giunta, Jr.
Landscape Specialist for NHDOT

The Presentation will be held at 7:00 PM in the Museum in the lower level of the Goodwin Library on Main Street in Farmington.  Light refreshments will be served.  The public is welcome and encouraged to attend. Following the presentation, the regular meeting of the Farmington Historical Society will be held.

Did you know there are 20 Lilac Species, 15 Lilac Species (Hybrids), over 1500 named lilac varieties? Lilacs have 2 centers of origin, Eastern Europe and the Orient.  The oldest lilacs in New Hampshire date back to at least 1750. These were purple lilacs that were imported from England and were located at the Wentworth-Coolidge Mansion in Portsmouth.  The purple lilac, Syringa vulgaris,was adopted as the state flower of New Hampshire in 1919.  That year the legislature considered many bills and amendments promoting the apple blossom, purple aster, wood lily, Mayflower, goldenrod, wild pasture rose, evening primrose and buttercup as potential state flowers. After a long and lively debate regarding the relative merits of each flower, the purple lilac was chosen because it represented the hardy character of the men and women of the Granite State.

Purple lilacs may be seen throughout New Hampshire on private and public lands having been planted by many generations of citizens.  Beautiful and fragrant blossoms in a wide range of colors appear in May of each year.  The Governor’s Lilac Commission was established by Governor John H. Sununu in 1984 to promote extensive planting of lilac’s throughout the State. It encourages the efforts of many individuals and groups to be involved in establishing our State Flower on public lands for all to enjoy. The Governor’s Lilac Commission provides plant materials and recommends cultural practices for growing lilacs to insure the best possible results. In an effort to help beautify New Hampshire’s highways, the Commission has taken on the additional responsibility of purchasing and assisting in planting wildflowers. Because of these efforts, Governor Stephen Merrill renamed the Commission on August 1, 1995.

The Governor's Lilac and Wildflower Commission partners with New Hampshire garden clubs, schools, youth groups, and other public organization to promote planting of lilacs and wildflowers throughout the state.

Learn More

Governor's Lilac and Wildflower Commission
http://www.nh.gov/lilacs/lilacs/index.htm

Wentworth-Coolidge Mansion
http://www.nhstateparks.com/coolidge.html

US Department of Agriculture Plant Profile: Syringa vulgaris
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=SYVU

Syringa vulgaris on Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Syringa_vulgaris

"In American colonies lilacs were introduced in the eighteenth century. Peter Collinson, F.R.S., wrote to the Pennsylvania gardener and botanist John Bartram, proposing to send him some, and remarked that John Custis of Virginia had a fine "collection", which Ann Leighton interpreted as signifying Common and Persian Lilacs, in both purple and white, "the entire range of lilacs possible" at the time."

 








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08 March 2012

Celebrating Henry Wilson's 200th Birthday


Henry Wilson
18th Vice President
Farmington's Favorite Son, Henry Wilson, had his 200th birthday this past February 16.  Born Jeremiah Colbath in 1812 in Farmington, he legally changed his name to Henry Wilson after moving to Natick, Massachusetts in 1833.  He became the 18th Vice President of the United States under Ulysses S. Grant in 1873 and died in office in 1875.

History buff and Wilson fan, Matt Menzi of Rochester, along with Sarah Repeta of Bedford, placed flags and flowers at Wilson's commemorative rock in Farmington on February 16th to commemorate the anniversary date of Vice-President Henry Wilson's 200 birthday.  Rochester Times editor John Nolan was there to record  the event for the Times.  Farmington Historical Society President, Dottie Bean, took the photo below of the group.

Sarah Repeta, John Nolan, and Matt Menzi celebrate Henry Wilson's 200th Birthday.

For More Information:

Henry Wilson on Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Wilson

Henry Wilson, 18th Vice President (1871-1875) on US Senate Website
http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/generic/VP_Henry_Wilson.htm

03 March 2012

Meeting House Painting Donated to the New Durham Historical Society

Cathy Orlowicz and Dottie Bean display the New Durham Meeting House painting to the audience.
At the regular meeting of the Farmington Historical Society last night, President Dottie Bean, on belhalf of the members of the Historical Society presented a painting to the New Durham Town Historian and Historical Society President, Cathy Orlowicz.  The painting was of the New Durham Meeting HOuse and was painted by New Durham historian and author, Ellen Jennings.  Farmington Historical Society President, Dottie Bean, said that the painting had been in the possession of the Farmington Historical Society for quite some time, and that it "really belongs in New Durham."  In her acceptance of the gift, Cathy Orlowicz thanked the membership of the Farmington Historical Society for the generous gift, and told the group that the painting is actually one in a set of four paintings by Ellen Jennings, each painting depicting the Meeting House in different season of the year. Farmington's donation of the "Fall Meeting House" painting represented the third Meeting House painting found by the New Durham Society.  The "Winter Meeting House" painting is still out there somewhere.  Anyone with any knowledge of the whereabouts of this painting should contact the Cathy Orlowiczat the New Durham Historical Society.  They'd love to know where all four of these lovely paintings are!

Cathy Orlowicz
President New Durham Historical Society

The New Durham Historical Society was once part of the Historical Society of Farmington and New Durham.  The group separated into the two historical societies in 1991.  The New Durham Historical Society meets the second Thursday of the months of February, April, June, August, October, and December at 7:30 pm in the New Durham Public Library.


New Durham Meeting House
Fall Meeting House
painted by Ellen Jennings

Ellen Cloutman Jennings authored the 18962 publication, "The History of New Durham, New Hampshire, From the First Settlement to the Present Time, Including That Part of Alton Which was Formerly New Durham Gore." (New Durham, N.H.: Ellen Cloutman Jennings, 1962.)

24 February 2012

March 2 Meeting: Granite State Valor During the American Civil War

“Granite State Valor During the American Civil War”

Friday, March 2nd
7:00 pm
Goodwin Library
Historical Society Museum

presented by 
Steven R. Closs

NH Historian and author, Steven Closs will be speaking at the Goodwin Library, as part of the programming presented by the Farmington Historical Society.  The presentation will focus on New Hampshire with Farmington in particular.

The presentation is open to the public and refreshments will be served.
Following the meeting, the Historical Society will conduct its monthly business meeting.  Membership is $5.00.  New members are always welcomed.



The New Hampshire historian and author will be speaking on New Hampshire's involvement in the American Civil War, with a focus on the soldiers from Hampton. Mr. Closs has written extensively on New Hampshire's involvement in the Civil War and has a forthcoming book titled Willing Sacrifice: Granite State Valor during the American Civil War.

Learn More

Steven Robert Closs on the Web
http://www.stevenrobertcloss.com/


31 January 2012

January 2012 Puddledock Press Available Online

The January 2012 Edition of the Puddledock Press is now available online.
Happy reading.
PuddledockPress-Jan2012

Other issues of the Puddledock along with other historical documents can be found on Scribd, posted by the Farmington Historical Society.  www.scribd.com.

20 January 2012

Students from Henry Wilson School to Write About Henry Wilson

Henry Wilson
On February 16, it will be the 200th birthday of Farmington's favorite son, Vice President Henry Wilson.  Students at Henry Wilson Memorial School are going to write essays about his political mission, which was to abolish slavery.

Wilson was born Jeremiah Colbath, in Farmington, near where the Farmington Country Club currently stands.  Born into a poor family, Jeremiah had several siblings die at early ages.  His family indentured him to be the servant of a nearby farmer from the age of 10 until 21. He worked long and hard, from sun up until sun down, for 11 months of each year.  indentured servitude is just another form of slavery.  He left Farmington when his servitude time was completed, and learned the shoe making trade in Natick, Massachusetts.  There, he legally changed his name to Henry Wilson, got himself out of poverty, and got into politics.  But he never forgot his Farmington roots and days of servitude.  He became a keen debater, and an advocate for the anti-slavery movement.  He eventually became a US Senator, fought in the Battle of Bull Run, and was instrumental in convincing President Lincoln to issue the Emancipation Proclamation.  He became Vice Present under Ulysses S. Grant, and wrote The Rise and Fall of Slave Power in the United States, an important historical narrative.

Henry Wilson Memorial School
The students at Henry Wilson Memorial School will pursue Wilson's passion, writing essays about slavery and its abolition.  The essays will be completed before the beginning of February, which is Black History Month.  The Farmington Historical Society is donating $100 to be used as prize money for the winning essays.  Students will be divided into two categories, Elementary grades 4-6; and Middle School, grades 7-8.  The first place winners will get $25, second place, $15, and third place $10.  The essays will be reviewed by the classroom teachers, with the best essays being forwarded for judging.  A school staff member, Historical Society President, and the national president of WOOF (Wilson Out of Obscurity Forthwith) will comprise the trio of judges awarding the final prizes in each category.
 The top essay in each category will be published in the February 16 edition of the Rochester Times, which coincides with Henry Wilson's 200th birthday.

On June 8th, National WOOF President, John Nolan, will present a 200th Birthday Anniversary Henry Wilson Show, as part of the 200th Birthday Celebration in Farmington. This Historical Society Presentation will be held a the Farmington Recreation Center.
Visit the Upcoming Events tab on this site for details.

Resources

Vice President Henry Wilson Tribute Page
http://www.stephaniepiro.com/FC%20Gallery%201%20-%20Henry%20Wilson.htm

SAU 61 Farmington School District
http://sau61.org/

Henry Wilson on Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Wilson

Art and History on the US Senate Site
http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/art/artifact/Sculpture_22_00018.htm

04 January 2012

Reverse Glass Paintings Donated to Goodwin Library


George and Martha Washington
Reverse Glass Paintings by W M Prior 1853

On November 18th, the Farmington Community was invited to a reception celebrating the recent donation of a pair of paintings of George and Martha Washington that were generously donated  to the Goodwin Library by the Thayer Family.  They were painted by William Matthew Prior in 1853 using the reverse glass technique. Reverse glass painting is an old art form which is dome by applying paint to a piece of glass and then viewing the image by turning the glass over and looking through the glass at the image. Verre Églomisé is a commonly used term to refer to the art of cold painting and gilding on the back of glass. In German it is also known as 'hinterglasmalerei.'  The paintings are permanently on display at the Goodwin Library in the stairwell between the main floor and the children's room.

The Friday reception was held from 2:00 pm - 4:00 pm at the Goodwin Library and light refreshments were served.

William Matthew Prior was a painter, born in Bath, Maine and later worked out of Portland and Boston, who primarily painted portraits of locals and family members.  

He was exceptional because he had the ability to paint in two styles, one a flat, quick manner with broad brush strokes and with little shade or shadow, which he used for more folk art style paintings, and the other in a more academic tradition with modeling and varied tonation, which produced a more formal product.


William Matthew Prior
Self Portrait, 1825

Two Andrews Children
a more flat, folk art style painting

Hiram Hall of Portland
a more traditional style painting

Resources

Reverse Glass Painting on Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reverse_glass_painting

The Celebrated William Matthew Prior (1806-1873) from Antiques & Fine Art Magazine
http://www.antiquesandfineart.com/articles/article.cfm?request=308




03 January 2012

December 2011 Puddledock Press

The December 2011 edition of the Farmington, NH Puddledock Press has been uploaded to our Scribd account and is available for viewing.

PuddledockPress-Dec2011 You can find past archived issues of the Puddledock Press by visiting the Puddledock Press page of this site. Just click on the Puddledock Press tab above. Hope you all had a safe, happy, and healthy holiday season.